I had to be my own Saviour.

I had to be my own Saviour.

Growing up, I always thought my parents would be my safety net, my saviours. But, when it came to saving myself and my child, I realized sooner than later that I had to be my very own saviour.

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How Could this Happen to me?

How Could this Happen to me?

It wasn't just the physical abuse, that wasn’t as common as the daily emotional, verbal and psychological abuse. Although I had a Master’s degree in engineering, he made me feel like I didn't even know how to count.

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Then I Found out I was Pregnant

Then I Found out I was Pregnant

A year and five months later, I became Mrs. Kazimi; married to a man twice my age. I was welcomed by my husband and his family in Canada. As I settled in to their home, that is when the abuse started. The very first time he hit me, I ran to my mother in law thinking she would make it stop. Instead, she told me to be patient because he was under a lot of pressure at work and was emotionally distressed due to the death of a close family member.

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It wasn’t easy, but I did it

It wasn’t easy, but I did it

I was frequently told that I have a lovely smile! I was, obviously, happy and flattered to hear these compliments because they reminded me that no one knew that I actually felt miserable, or that I cried myself to sleep or that I contemplated suicide. No one knew what it took to force this smile on my face. I needed to convince everyone around that I was perfectly happy and my marriage was great.

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How I Saved My Own Life

How I Saved My Own Life

As newcomers to the country, we struggled financially, coping with harsh winters and culture shock, but I soon gave birth to two beautiful children that made everything worth it. From far away, we seemed like the typical immigrant family. Unfortunately, underneath the surface were the hidden family secrets. The ones I tried to hide and "get over".

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Refuge. Restart. Resettle.

Refuge. Restart. Resettle.

Her children, Muhammad and Mariam, were afraid of what was to come during their time at Nisa Homes. At past shelters and homes, they had faced abuse, both physical and verbal, not only from fellow residents but also from staff members. Mahnoor recalls arriving at one particular shelter where they refused to let Muhammad use the washroom due to it being “after hours”. He was forced to urinate outside of the building that night. 

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